COULD CALIFORNIA REDUCE AIDS BY MODELING NEVADA PROSTITUTION LAW? Skip over navigation
LexisNexis® Browse Law Reviews and Treatises
Skip over navigation
Sign in with your lexis.com® ID to access the full text of this article.
-OR-
Order the full text of this article if you do not have a lexis.com® ID.
 
Price: 
US $22.00 (+ tax)
 
 

Copyright (c) 1994 The Law Review Association Western State University College of Law
San Diego Justice Journal

COULD CALIFORNIA REDUCE AIDS BY MODELING NEVADA PROSTITUTION LAW?

Summer, 1994

2 San Diego Justice J. 491

Author

James R. Stout*, Thomas S. Tanana, Esq.**

Excerpt



INTRODUCTION

Increasing public concern over Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (hereinafter "AIDS") has led California legislators to fine-tune California prostitution laws with the hope more restrictive laws will help prevent the spread of AIDS through the community. Prostitution and solicitation of prostitution are illegal in California. Nevada, California's neighbor to the east, has developed a legal, regulated system of prostitution control which has reduced the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (hereinafter STD's).

This Note suggests Nevada's prostitution laws have helped to reduce the spread of AIDS in Nevada, and should seriously be considered by California legislators. A comparison is made of the prostitution controls currently used in Nevada with those used in California. The Nevada system reduces disease transmission while California's does not. Rather than increase funding in support of the current system, California legislators should develop a system of prostitution control modeled after the system used in Nevada.



NEVADA'S LEGAL BUT REGULATED SYSTEM

In general, mining communities have attracted large numbers of prostitutes and, because Nevada's largest industry was originally gold and silver mining, prostitution was prevalent around its mining towns. 1 During the nineteenth century, Nevada's population increased and its industry base slowly shifted away from mining into other industries. 2 Eventually, this diversification created a less extreme political climate which allowed various special-interest organizations to successfully lobby state legislators. 3 The legislators then passed laws restricting prostitution. 4 In 1887, continuous pressure from special-interest groups forced the legislature to enact one of its first prostitution laws, Nevada ...
 
 
If you are interested in obtaining a lexis.com® ID and Password, please contact us at 1-(800)-227-4908 or visit us at http://www.lexisnexis.com/.
Search Documents
 
eg., Environmental Insurance Coverage Under the Comprehensive General Liability Policy
 
 
 
 

Lexis® Web - The only search engine that delivers free web content specifically from legal sites validated by LexisNexis® attorney editors and includes tools for faster research and more relevant results.

 
LexisNexis Store
Research Now - Go to lexis.com
Connect the Dots - Free 1 hour webcast
Share. Network. Discover. - Go to LexisNexis Communities