SECTION IV: CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW: Characteristics of International Administration in Crisis Areas: A View from the United States of America Skip over navigation
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Copyright (c) 2006 The American Society of Comparative Law, Inc.
The American Journal of Comparative Law

SECTION IV: CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW: Characteristics of International Administration in Crisis Areas: A View from the United States of America

Supplement, Fall 2006

54 Am. J. Comp. L. 443

Author

FRED L. MORRISON*

Excerpt



As the world's sole remaining superpower, the United States finds itself involved in virtually all international crisis situations. In two recent cases, Afghanistan and Iraq, it has been a major protagonist in the conflict itself before turning its attention to post-conflict issues. In situations in which the United Nations is acting after violence in a crisis area, the United States has provided troops for United Nations operations or in concert with them. In still other instances, while not providing troops it has supplied logistical support for the crisis teams. In virtually every international crisis, it offers humanitarian assistance. The United States also has a role in establishing the United Nations parameters for crisis administration, since its concurrence as a permanent member of the Security Council is necessary to any formal resolution by that body. It also has exercised its diplomatic influence and even the explicit or implicit threat of reductions of foreign assistance to encourage settlement of long-standing disputes.

The articulated purposes of these measures have included resistance to aggression 1 and response to terrorist attacks, 2 as well as a general humanitarian objective. 3 Although the quantitative adequacy of its generosity in relation to its own gross national product is sometimes criticized, it is a major supplier of international aid to developing countries, including those in post-crisis situations.

The wide variety of United States missions makes a simple response to the prescribed questions for this topic especially difficult. One approach would limit the scope of this essay to ...
 
 
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