ARTICLE: THE HIGH COST OF GLOBAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THEFT: AN ANALYSIS OF CURRENT TRENDS, THE TRIPS AGREEMENT, AND FUTURE APPROACHES TO COMBAT THE PROBLEM Skip over navigation
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Copyright 2007 Wake Forest University School of Law
Wake Forest Intellectual Property Law Journal

ARTICLE: THE HIGH COST OF GLOBAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THEFT: AN ANALYSIS OF CURRENT TRENDS, THE TRIPS AGREEMENT, AND FUTURE APPROACHES TO COMBAT THE PROBLEM

Spring, 2007

Wake Forest Intellectual Property Law Journal

7 Wake Forest Intell. Prop. L.J. 209

Author

Candace S. Friel +

Excerpt

In 2002, the United States Department of Justice reported that a sixteen-year-old liver transplant patient in New York began receiving regular injections to treat his post-transplant related anemia shortly after surgery. 1 Anemia robs the body's red blood cells of oxygen and, in turn, adds extreme pressure on the heart. 2 It is a potentially deadly disease if left untreated. 3 Despite receiving weekly injections of the anemia medication, the name of which was not disclosed by the Department of Justice for privacy reasons, the boy's anemic condition did not improve and he began to develop atypical complications following his treatments. 4 The boy experienced excruciatingly painful muscle spasms after each injection, despite an otherwise successful transplant. 5 Eight weeks later, after extensive testing, doctors discovered that the injectable medication used to treat the boy's anemia was counterfeit and lacked the sufficient dosage necessary for his treatment. 6

Counterfeit versions of medications used to treat Parkinson's disease, HIV-AIDS, heart-related conditions, and various infections have also been discovered throughout the United States. 7 For example, reports to the Department of Justice include counterfeit prescription tablets made with lead-based paint (the type normally used to paint road lines) and floor wax, 8 oral contraceptives made of wheat flour, and antibiotic eye drops composed of tap water. 9 In September 2004, a young teenager from Connecticut awoke to an explosion in his bedroom. 10 Investigators determined a counterfeit cellular phone battery that was charging in the boy's bedroom caused the explosion. 11

The ...
 
 
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